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ISSUE ARCHIVES

SEPT/ OCT 2001
Volume 44 /  Issue 5

IN THIS ISSUE
Project Articles
Colonial Dry Sink
Hanging Wall Desk
Child's Pounding Bench and A Wooden Toy Top

DEPARTMENTS
Ask Smitty
Owner’s Gallery
Letters from Owners
 
Academy Notes
Finishing Touches - Pt.1 Preparing the Surface
 
Service Pointers
Jointer Service Pointers
 
Safety Tips
Table Saw Safety

What's New
The 5-Foot Connector Tubes

EDUCATION
Find A Shopsmith Woodworking Academy Near You
National Woodworking Academy in Dayton, OH

ONLINE CATALOGS
Online Accessory Catalog

Request Printed Accessory Catalog
Online Replacement Parts Catalog

MARK V INFORMATION
Find A Shopsmith
MARK V Demo Near You

Request MARK V Information Package

LINKS
Links Worth Visiting
Free Woodworking Tips

FEEDBACK
Contacting Shopsmith

Copyright 2001.
Shopsmith, Inc.
All Rights Reserved

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Major
Project
Article

The Colonial Dry Sink

Recalling the earlier days and simpler ways of life -- in Colonial America

In early America, long before the days of shower massages and whirlpool tubs, the dry sink was as commonplace and functional as any fully plumbed sink in a modern, American home. Used with a pottery basin and pitcher, it offered a recessed well on top to prevent the water from splashing out while washing or shaving. And although its original purpose has been made obsolete by modern-day plumbing, there's still a place for this attractive piece of furniture in our homes.

The techniques used to build this project are simple enough, even for beginning woodworkers who are willing to take their time and move step-by-step through the various techniques. There's nothing particularly complicated here. The majority of the components (including the drawer fronts) are assembled with dowels and the raised panel doors feature simple joinery, as well. When you've finished, you'll have a handsome piece of furniture that will make a great addition to virtually any room of the house.

Continue . . .